The official Mike Bellm's

Bellm TCs


TC Contender, G2, Encore/ProHunter Performance Center

 




Important Foreword and Disclaimer:
4 to 6 pound and heavier factory triggers simply do not let you do your best shooting, and for the Encore and G2 shooting systems to realize their potentials for you, the guy that paid hard dollars for the TC firearms, remedial work on the rough cast, roughly finished trigger parts, and heavy trigger/sear springs is not only essential, but we feel you are being cheated if the work is not done.

A heavy, rough trigger pull undermines the entire firearm.

However, safety and safe functioning of these frames must always be the top consideration. To this end, the information provided here, based on our years of experience doing trigger jobs and supporting thousands of individuals just like you doing their own work, is information we are glad to share with others in the TC shooting community helping them to obtain a smooth trigger pull at the weight that best suits THEIR needs, not the defensive posture of a company legal staff.

Unlike most of the firearms "industry," we believe gunwork is not some rocket science to be guarded, and we believe 99% of shooters are fully capable of working responsibly on their own guns IF what is needed to be done is explained to them. We believe in you and are here to help as fellow members of the TC shooting community.

You MUST use good judgement at all times and you MUST be aware that there are sets of conditions that may not be covered in our instructions, may be unique to your situation, or that you might not comprehend.

We exercise due diligence in verifying first hand that the procedures we put forth as lucidly as we can are valid to the very best of our knowledge and ability, but SINCE WE HAVE NO CONTROL OVER WHAT YOU DO WITH THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN WRITING OR VERBALLY, OR OUR PRODUCTS, NEITHER MIKE BELLM TCs, ITS STAFF, NOR DENNIS M. "MIKE" BELLM ASSUME ANY LIABILITY FOR THE RESULTS YOU OBTAIN USING OUR INSTRUCTIONS, TOOLS, OR PRODUCTS.

ANY WORK YOU DO ON YOUR FRAMES WITH YOUR OWN TWO HANDS IS ENTIRELY YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

FURTHER, ANY MODIFICATION YOU MAKE TO THE FRAME OR TC FACTORY MADE BARREL IS NOT CONDONED BY TC AND IN SOME INSTANCES MAY VOID YOUR WARRANTY. OUR ADVICE IS TO REMOVE ANY PARTS YOU MODIFY BEFORE SENDING THE FRAME TO TC IF FOR SOME REASON YOU FIND IT NECESSARY. TC WILL RESTORE THE FRAME TO FACTORY ORIGINAL, BUT YOU WILL STILL HAVE YOUR PARTS TO REINSTALL IF YOU WANT TO.

The Problem
Modifications to the Encore or G2 mechanism can cause the hammer to not stay securely cocked due to its unusual design with the sear notch angled downward.

Because the sear notch, a 90 degree cut in the sear, is tilted downward with the hammer nose resting on the bottom side of the notch, any changes you make on the sear notch or hammer nose smoothing up these horrendously rough surfaces can result in the hammer nose slipping off the sear notch instead of staying securely cocked. And of course if the hammer is not securely cocked, the gun may fire unexpectedly with disasterous results.

(I don't like the word "accidental" discharge. Derelict, perhaps, but not accidental. If you exercise due diligence by checking your frames for push off periodically WITH THE GUN UNLOADED OF COURSE, you will readily detect any tendency for the hammer to not stay securely cocked. Moderate pressure forward on the hammer should not push it off. )

Primary Causes of the Hammer Not Staying Cocked
  • Installing a lighter trigger/sear spring or degrading the factory trigger/sear spring reduces the rearward pressure on the sear that helps keep the hammer cocked,
  • TRANSLATION; IF YOU INSTALL A LIGHTER TRIGGER/SEAR SPRING AND POLISH THE HAMMER NOSE AND SEAR NOTCH, THE HAMMER WILL HAVE MORE TENDENCY TO SLIP OFF THE "SLIPPERY SLOPE" OF THE SEAR NOTCH,
  • Polishing the sear notch and/or hammer nose reduces friction at their conact points,
  • We have also found that increasing the hammer spring tension of course puts more force on the hammer and sear notch thus making the hammer more prone to slipping down the "slippery slope" of the sear notch,
  • Decreasing the amount of engagement between the hammer nose and sear notch also results in the hammer not staying securely cocked, so DO NOT go for a short engagement when working on the sear notch and hammer nose.

THE FIRST STEPS TO THE CURE
If you are using a hammer extension or if you are experiencing misfires, DO use our heavier hammer springs..... which as noted above will also increase the tendency for the hammer to slip off the sear notch.

First, increase the engagement of the hammer nose into the sear notch by stoning the bottom rough cast edge of the hammer nose flat with a Diamond EZE Lap, then polish this surface smooth with our polishing stones.

Take the ridge on the bottom of the hammer nose down about half way, not completely flat.

Very lightly radius the forward end of this flat surface using the Arkansas polishing stone we provide. You do not want a sharp corner transferring every sensation of movement like a phonograph needle.

The bottom of the hammer nose as it comes from the factory has a sharp edge cast into it that is back from the tip of the hammer nose by quite some distance. Flattening the bottom of the hammer nose moves the point of contact with the sear notch forward, deeper into the notch and more securely cocked. Again, only take this ridge down about half way.

If the hammer still will readily push off with moderate thumb pressure forward on it, increase the engagement more by thinning the top of the hammer nose where it contacts the UPPER side of the notch. You can, as illustrated in our trigger job instructions, place the hammer, sear, and trigger pivot pins through the left side of the frame with one finger inside the frame holding the pins up where you can assemble the hammer, sear, and trigger on their respective pivot pins. By doing so, you can closely examine how the hammer nose fits into the notch and see where the upper point of contact is.

Use the Diamond EZE Lap to remove material at this point..... the point where the upper side of the hammer nose makes actual contact with the upper side of the sear notch.

IF THE HAMMER WILL STILL READILY PUSH OFF
The next step is to alter the sear notch from its original 90 degree included angle to an 80 degree included angle, bringing the inside corner of the sear notch down and making the lower contact surface approximately 10 degrees less vertical.... ie, more horizontal, less steep so the hammer nose has less tendency to slip down off of it.

So how do you determine a 10 degree change? That is what we grappled with for some time. For years we altered the sear notch to a more horizontal plane using guess and by golly tempered with fine intuitive feel from doing hundreds of trigger jobs this way.

There had to be an easier way to regulate this change in the sear angle for more predictable results, and thus we started altering No. 11 F Diamond EZE Laps by first 5 degrees, 10 degrees, and even 15 degrees. Once in awhile we still find that a 10 degree change, ie, an 80 degree included angle, is not quite enough change, but you can still skew the angle some with the 80 degree lap.

We have since gone to wider, shorter Diamond EZE Laps that are easier to manipulate.

For the vast majority of frames we have done trigger jobs on, the 10 degree change to an 80 degree included angle has been ideal and is the angle we have settled on as standard. It results in the hammer being securely cocked without having to go ultra light with the trigger/sear spring tension to get the pull weight down to what the customer specifies.

ANOTHER TRANSLATION; CLOSING UP THE SEAR NOTCH TO 80 DEGREES ALSO INCREASES THE TRIGGER PULL AND REQUIRES USE OF A SOMEWHAT LIGHTER TRIGGER/SEAR SPRING ON ONE HAND.....

BUT ON THE OTHER HAND, INSTALLING A HEAVIER HAMMER SPRING REDUCES THE PULL WEIGHT.

THE BOTTOM LINE IS THAT THIS IS A DYNAMIC SYSTEM BALANCING THE FORCES OF HAMMER TENSION, SEAR NOTCH ANGLE AND ENGAGEMENT, AND TRIGGER/SEAR SPRING TENSION.

Using the "safe" side of the Diamond EZE Lap as a guide by holding the TOP side of the sear notch solidly flat on it and stroking the sear over the lap, the grit side of the EZE Lap then cuts the new angle into the sear surface.

Once the sear angle is changed to 80 degrees, a square or rectangular stone cannot get into the notch to polish it. A triangular stone works and gets into the notch ok, but if you are not careful, you can round the sear notch and still not get the hammer to stay securely cocked.

When we finally got a supply of Wyoming Stone and started cutting it ourselves, we experimented for some time with stones cut to the same matching 80 degree angle as the Diamond EZE Lap and found this combination to be ideal for controlling the sear notch angle when polishing it. Thus you use the 80 degree EZE Lap and the 80 degree Arkansas Stone held exactly the same way and in the same manner for both recutting the notch and polishing the notch to a mirror finish.

This is what it looks like from an end view of the 80 degree Diamond EZE Lap with the sear notch positioned on it.
How to orient Encore and G2 sear notches on the 80 degree Diamond EZE Lap for recutting the notch and the companion 80 degree Wyoming Stone for polishing the notch.

Enlarged, more readable text from drawing
Upper side of sear notch held flat on angled surface
This side of stone cuts into inside corner of sear notch until this side of sear notch is parallel with this side of stone forming an 80 degree sear angle.


 

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